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Can Genetic Tests Help Diagnose Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome?

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This article was originally published on WeedMaps and appears here with permission.

As awareness of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) expands, both among medical doctors and patients, we are collectively becoming more and more able to identify a condition that has been historically hard to diagnose. After all, it seems counterintuitive that cannabis can cause many of the symptoms it’s used to treat. 

Researchers are taking the current understanding of this severe and often debilitating condition one step further by attempting to pinpoint genetic markers that could be used to more readily diagnose CHS. This could potentially prevent those who are vulnerable from developing it in the first place.

Below, find out how CHS relates to genetics and what is being done in the medical world to combat the onset of the cannabis-based condition. 

What is cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome?

Still not widely known or completely understood, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a condition that is characterized by a strong, and often enduring, sensitivity to THC — and possibly other cannabinoids. CHS causes ongoing abdominal pain, cramping, nausea, and vomiting when cannabis is consumed.

What causes CHS?

While our understanding of the condition is still developing, CHS seems to occur most often in folks who consume high-potency cannabis and cannabis products regularly for long periods of time. What is happening in the body is a long-term and intense stimulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), along with other receptors and systems outside the ECS.

While medical science is still working to uncover the more complex and nuanced factors contributing to CHS, according to Dr. Ethan Russo, a renowned pioneer in cannabis research, it might be fair to say that CHS isn’t a functional gastrointestinal disorder so much as a “manifestation of gene and environmental interaction in a rare genetic disease, unmasked by excessive THC exposure.”

What doesn’t cause CHS? Pesticides. 

Dr. Russo thinks it’s important to dispel the myth that CHS is caused by the pesticides or neem oil used in plant cultivation. “That just doesn’t hold water as an explanation,” Dr. Russo said. “There are more pesticides in use now than when CHS was first discovered, and pesticide reactions are quite different to what we see with CHS. Additionally, it’s been shown that synthetic cannabinoids, which are quite potent, can induce CHS — and while they are not pure, they don’t have pesticides in them.”

The difficulty and high cost of diagnosing CHS

The primary symptoms of CHS — cyclic abdominal cramping, nausea, and vomiting — are not unique to this condition, making CHS hard to diagnose. Because of this, CHS is considered among doctors to be a “diagnosis of exclusion,” or a diagnosis that is made when all other probable causes are ruled out. 

According to an estimate made in a 2019 study, it took the average ER a whopping $76,920.92 in related testing expenses to diagnose CHS, while a 2018 paper estimated the average patient cost of a 

Full story available on Benzinga.com

Original Article: benzinga.com

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Congress Under Pressure: Colorado Officials Push for Cannabis Banking Reform

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With the end of Congress’ session just around the corner, marijuana advocates, stakeholders and lawmakers continue to push for marijuana banking policy change.

This time, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis (D) joined forces with Lt. Gov. Dianne Primavera (D), Attorney General Phil Weiser (D), Treasurer Dave Young (D) and Department of Public Safety (DPS) Executive Director Stan Hilkey in urging congressional leaders to revisit the issue, reported Marijuana Moment.

In a letter sent on Monday to both House and Senate leaders, Colorado officials focused on the impact which a bipartisan marijuana banking bill will have in terms of public safety and industry equity,

“The lack of safe banking and financial services for the cannabis industry in the State of Colorado has become a dire public safety issue for highly regulated cannabis businesses operating in compliance with state …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

Original Post: benzinga.com

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New Data Shows Weed Legalization a Boon for Real Estate, New Jobs and Tax Revenue

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A new report from the Federal Reserve Bank shed light on the economic impact marijuana legalization has had in recent years, reported Marijuana Moment. Policy changes on the state level have resulted in increased commercial real estate demand, as well as a surge in tax revenues while creating more jobs.

According to an analysis from the Kansas City arm of the Central Bank, which collected data from several states under its jurisdiction, the Tenth Federal Reserve District, the cannabis industry has become one of the main economic sectors positioned to grow substantially in the coming period.

“Overall, the marijuana industry has had a significant effect on the economies of Tenth District states in the initial years after legalization,” the report said. “The emergence of the industry has …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

Article: benzinga.com

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Will Missouri Legalize Cannabis? Amendment 3 Suffers Another Attack This Time by State NAACP

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Cannabis legalization efforts in Missouri are under attack once again, this time by The Missouri State Conference of the NAACP.

What Happened

The Missouri NAACP, breaking with chapters in the St. Louis area is urging its members to vote against Amendment 3 on the Nov. 8 ballot, reported the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch.

The group announced Thursday that it believes recreational marijuana legalization, as it is proposed under Amendment 3, would prevent minorities from entering the cannabis industry. 

“Marijuana possession should not be a constitutional crime. Additionally, for years now, Black people, other minorities, and people who have been criminalized by marijuana laws in the past have been unable to enter the medical marijuana market,” the Missouri NAACP wrote. “That is not right. In an effort to prevent the permanent exclusion of minorities from the cannabis industry in the state of Missouri, the NAACP calls upon every voter to reject the criminalization of marijuana possession, de facto racist regulation of the cannabis market, and the wool being pulled over our eyes by the supporters of Amendment 3.”

Under Amendment 3, the first “comprehensive” cannabis business licenses would be provided to existing medical marijuana companies. 

The state’s chapter highlighted that the amendment “does not increase the number of available full market licenses” and claims that giving “micro” business licenses to disadvantaged groups makes a “very limited” program. 

According to Nimrod “Rod” Chapel Jr., president of the Missouri NAACP, members agreed last week …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

Source: benzinga.com

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